Pako88

Pako88

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1. The uncertainty effect
Imagine that you are faced with a choice: lunch break and only two cafes in the area. The first one you know well, you like it, but you cannot say that you are delighted with it. You have never been to the second cafe. It can turn out to be both good and bad.



What will you choose? Most people in this situation will prefer the first cafe. The unknown effect makes us avoid options that we know nothing about.



How to use in sales: Make sure people are well informed about the results and benefits of purchasing your product. Answer their questions in a timely manner to increase awareness quickly.



2. Anchor effect, or anchoring
Although you shouldn't judge a book by its cover, unfortunately, that's what our brains do.



The first information we receive about a person or situation shapes our attitude. Why? The detail that comes into the focus of perception from the very beginning acts as a basis for comparison. Whatever happens in the future, we will compare the information received with this initial image.



How to use in sales: The first impression matters most. Careful consideration should be given to how the product will be presented to the public for the first time. Try to make your introduction to him positive and create high expectations.



3. Backfire effect
Reasonably convincing a person of anything that contradicts his deepest beliefs, you are doomed to failure. Moreover, due to the effect of the opposite result, you will only more firmly convince your interlocutor that he is right. By trying to fend off your arguments, he will go deeper into the position he is defending.



How to use in sales: When your client is wrong about something, don't argue with him. Just ask to explain the point of view. He himself will find holes in his arguments and admit the mistake.



4. The effect of reward devaluation
Offer your child a choice: a candy now or two candies tomorrow. You will witness the effect of reward devaluation, or hyperbolic discounting - because the child will probably choose one candy, but immediately.



Adults are no different from children in many situations. Our brains tend to favor quick rewards over long-term rewards. The value of the reward decreases as the period of its receipt increases.
1. The uncertainty effect
Imagine that you are faced with a choice: lunch break and only two cafes in the area. The first one you know well, you like it, but you cannot say that you are delighted with it. You have never been to the second cafe. It can turn out to be both good and bad.



What will you choose? Most people in this situation will prefer the first cafe. The unknown effect makes us avoid options that we know nothing about.



How to use in sales: Make sure people are well informed about the results and benefits of purchasing your product. Answer their questions in a timely manner to increase awareness quickly.



2. Anchor effect, or anchoring
Although you shouldn't judge a book by its cover, unfortunately, that's what our brains do.



The first information we receive about a person or situation shapes our attitude. Why? The detail that comes into the focus of perception from the very beginning acts as a basis for comparison. Whatever happens in the future, we will compare the information received with this initial image.



How to use in sales: The first impression matters most. Careful consideration should be given to how the product will be presented to the public for the first time. Try to make your introduction to him positive and create high expectations.



3. Backfire effect
Reasonably convincing a person of anything that contradicts his deepest beliefs, you are doomed to failure. Moreover, due to the effect of the opposite result, you will only more firmly convince your interlocutor that he is right. By trying to fend off your arguments, he will go deeper into the position he is defending.



How to use in sales: When your client is wrong about something, don't argue with him. Just ask to explain the point of view. He himself will find holes in his arguments and admit the mistake.



4. The effect of reward devaluation
Offer your child a choice: a candy now or two candies tomorrow. You will witness the effect of reward devaluation, or hyperbolic discounting - because the child will probably choose one candy, but immediately.



Adults are no different from children in many situations. Our brains tend to favor quick rewards over long-term rewards. The value of the reward decreases as the period of its receipt increases.



How to use it in sales: Emphasize the benefits available immediately after purchasing the product. Especially if the main results will only appear in a few months.



5. The effect of joining the majority
We want most of all what those around us already own. And the more people around us use certain things, the stronger our desire to receive them.



How to use it in sales: The power of social proof is incredible - harness this potential in your marketing. Reviews, comments, photos of satisfied customers can explode your sales.



6. Decoy effect
Having trouble choosing between two options? Perhaps the third one will simplify everything. The decoy effect is irrational, but it is scientifically proven.



In a study conducted by Duke University, participants were asked to choose one of two places to dine: a five-star restaurant located far away or a three-star restaurant nearby. It was difficult to make a decision. But when a third option appeared—a four-star restaurant further away than the other two—it was not difficult to choose a five-star one. The best quality and second place in terms of distance is the optimal solution.



How to use it in sales: Offer different options for one offer. If the client is in doubt, throw out bait that will incline you to the choice you want.



7. Rhyme effect
In 1994, lawyer Johnnie Cochran showed ingenuity in defending football player O'Jay Simpson. His famous saying “If it doesn’t fit, you must acquit” (if it doesn’t fit, the accused should be acquitted), the power of which lay in the presence of a rhyme in the words “fit” and “acquit”.



Rhyming words are easy to remember. But Cochran used rhyme in this case as a psychological device. It seems to people that those statements in which rhyme is present are more truthful than statements without it.



How to use it in sales: Introduce your product with a couple of rhyming lines. Also use rhyme to highlight obscure aspects of your offer.


8. IKEA effect
The IKEA effect is that people value hand-assembled/made things more than things made by others. By using this feature correctly, sellers can increase their profits.



How to use it in sales: Allow prospects to participate in the creation of products or services. The more they feel like they are creating the product/service themselves, the more they will want to take advantage of the offer.



9. The effect of repetition, or illusory truth
How does hypnosis put people to sleep? In films, the process looks like this: the hypnotist repeats the words “you feel sleepy, you fall asleep...”. Suddenly the man's eyes close and he falls asleep. What's happening?



The answer is the illusory truth effect. Frequent repetition convinces of the truth of the statement. In other words, it is easier for us to believe what is said 10 times than what we have heard only a couple of times.



“Repetition is the easiest and most common method of persuasion,” explains Dr. Jeremy Dean.



How to use it in sales: Determine the main message of your offer and communicate it to the consumer many times.



10. Last impression effect
Why do speakers tend to end on a high note? This is how our perception works: a person remembers the climax and ending best. If you are shown a boring movie with one exciting scene and a bright ending, you will remember it better than just a good movie with no impressive moments.



How to use it in sales: Make sure your product presentation has a strong punch line and a memorable ending. If you're pressed for time, don't try to make an average presentation. Better focus on the key points.



11. Fear of loss
Most people are very afraid to take risks. The loss of what you have acquired is much more painful than the acquisition of something new and pleasant. Knowing this is very important when creating a brand.



How to use it in sales: Emotions are the strongest motivator. Depending on what you sell, show what your customers have to lose if they don't buy your product. Feeling that something they already own is at stake, people are more willing to take risks.



12. Status quo
If you place a frog in cold water, and then slowly increase the temperature of the water, the frog will not jump out - but will cook in this water, without even noticing. It's the same with people: because we tend to maintain the status quo, we are blind to impending dangers.



It is always easier to do nothing than to decide on something new. Thanks to the uncertainty effect (see point 1), what we own always seems more attractive than something unusual.



How to use it in sales: This bias explains why a quarter of potential deals fail. There are two strategies to avoid this outcome. If your offer is unique in the market, carefully study your audience's concerns and reassure them.



If the consumer chooses from several options, then he is aware of the difficulties. Make sure he understands the cost of passivity and encourage him to take action.
 
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